Registration of Short-Term Lettings 2022

In an effort to enhance and more robustly enforce the regulations introduced on short-term lets in 2019, Government is now introducing a new bill, the General Scheme of the Registration of Short-Term Tourist Letting Bill 2022, which would place both the landlord as well as the short-term let platform accountable for any properties advertised which do not have the proper planning permission.

The Issue

The well-documented supply crisis in Ireland’s long-term housing market is an issue of critical concern. Threshold has been campaigning for the regulation of short-term lets since 2018, as it became apparent that their increasing numbers were causing disruption to the Irish long-term housing market.

Threshold campaigned for the introduction of the 2019 regulations and was happy to see them in effect. The regulations introduced in July 2019 require homeowners in Rent Pressure Zones (RPZs) such as Dublin, to apply to their local authority for planning permission to change property use to short-term lettings, where these lettings exceed 90 days in the year.

However, as all of Dublin is defined as an RPZ, it is unlikely that change of property purpose permission would be granted if one were to apply. This is to make sure viable housing is kept on the long-term rental market.

However, we did not see this being well enforced. Multiple cases have been discovered throughout the country where landlords are leasing out appropriate long-term rental properties, such as houses and apartments, as short-term stays for holidaymakers – allowing them to gain a far greater income.

The Solution

In an attempt to further enforce the 2019 regulations and bring the much-needed stock back into the long-term rental market, the new bill, General Scheme of the Registration of Short-Term Tourist Letting Bill 2022, means online platforms will not be able to advertise properties in RPZs that do not have the requisite Failte Ireland registration number. This number must be visible on the listing on the short-term letting website.

While this legislation is not a silver bullet for the supply of homes in the private rented sector, it will help in returning homes back to the longer-term rental market, which is critical right now.

Case Study: Dublin

According to data* from Inside AirBnB, there were 2,102 properties operated by hosts advertising more than one property. This means there are potentially hundreds of homes that could be made available to those looking for a long-term home. 

 Daft.ie** has only 1,105 properties to rent in all of Dublin.

The sample of those selected only needs to let out their properties for a few nights a month to collect the equivalent income in the private rental market, rather than rent even some of their properties to a family in the area. 

One host advertises 149 properties (as of 15/03/2024) in Dublin, some of which they are listed as a co-host. These properties are dotted across Dublin city centre and county.

One host advertises 88 properties (as of 15/03/2024) in Dublin dotted across Dublin 6, Dublin 8, and city centre. For example, a two-bed and two-bath property in Rathmines 6 with a 6-night minimum stay will cost you €508 per night. This totals €3050 for six days. By comparison, a two-bed and two-bath in Rathmines is advertised on Daft for €2,100 a month.

Case Study: Galway

According to data from Inside AirBnB, 1,127 listings in Galway City and County are entire properties. 502 are advertised by hosts with more than two properties. This means there are potentially over a few hundred homes that could be made available to those looking for a long-term home. 

Daft.ie has only 73 properties to rent in all of Galway County.

This is a nearly seven-fold difference between the properties available for short-term and long-term let in Galway.

One host (8 years hosting) has 25 homes ranging from traditional townhouses to penthouse apartments – most of which are in Galway City. A two-night weekend stay in a two-bed costs €441.  

Meanwhile, the only other equivalent property that is available on Daft.ie that is under €2000 per month is €467 a week. As with other examples listed here, this host can earn, in less than two weeks, the equivalent income in the private rental market. Regulation is needed so families in Galway can access much-needed housing stock.

Case Study: Cork

According to data from Inside AirBnB, 1,298 listings in Cork City and County are entire properties. 538 are advertised by hosts with more than 2 properties. This is in addition to the growing number of homes that could be made available to those looking for a long-term home. 

Daft.ie has only 108 properties to rent in all of Cork County.

This is more than a twelve-fold difference between the properties available for short-term and long-term let in Cork.

One host has 12 homes in Cork and Kerry listed as short-term lets. One of their two-bed apartments in Cork City centre is €490 for a two-night weekend stay.

Case Study: Limerick

As per the Inside AirBnB data, 71 listings are advertised by hosts with more than 2 properties.

Daft.ie has only 43 properties to rent in Limerick County.

There are almost double the properties to let on the short-term market compared to the long-term rental market.

One host, hosting 9 years, has 35 listings which are across multiple locations in Ireland (with a number in the UK also). The host appears to run a property management company. A five-bed home near a business park is advertised as suitable for workers. A 15-night stay (minimum stay) will cost you €2,045.

*Data from Inside AirBnB was gathered in December 2023
**Data from Daft.ie was gathered on the March 2024

Join our email list

Keep current with issues affecting renters & receive updates on the difference we’re making with your support.